FAQ

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

FAQ CHART

Q1. What material is used for the rods in these valves?

Q2. Regarding the S2-100P:

Q3. Are these valves for in-tank or out-of-tank or both types of mounting?

Q4. Can these valves be used in open tanks or closed tanks or both types of tanks?

Q5. If these valves can be used in closed tanks, should the closed tank be vented?

Q6. What is the temperature range for these valves (F)?

Q7. Literature indicates that pipe size is FIP:

Q8. Do these valves meet any of the following specifications? If yes, please list specific specification.

Q9. What is the float material for these valves?

Q10. What does NPT stand for?

Q11. For your threaded plumbing connections, do you typically use pipe dope (Pipe Joint Compound), thread tape (aka Teflon Tape) or some other type of sealant/lubricant?

Q12. What is the main problem that you find when valves are not working properly?

Q13. Which valves use diaphragms that have the center hole punched out and what size is it?


 

Q1. What material is used for the rods in these valves?

 Brass

Q2. Regarding the S2-100P:

A. Do these valves have bushings?

Yes (2)

B. If yes, what size(s) are these bushings?

1/2″ and 3/4″

C. What type of threads do these bushings have?

Female iron pipe thread – NPT

Q3. Are these valves for in-tank or out-of-tank or both types of mounting?

Both

Q4. Can these valves be used in open tanks or closed tanks or both types of tanks?

Both

Q5. If these valves can be used in closed tanks, should the closed tank be vented?

Yes

Q6. What is the temperature range for these valves (F)?

34 Degrees Fahrenheit to 160 Degrees Fahrenheit

Q7. Literature indicates that pipe size is FIP:

A. Does that also mean NPT?

Yes

B. Is the gender of these connections male or female?

Female

Q8. Do these valves meet any of the following specifications? If yes, please list specific specification.

NSF: N/A

UL: N/A

C-UL: N/A

CSA: N/A

FM: N/A

Q9. What is the float material for these valves?

Body is glass filled nylon, diaphragm is made of BASF Elastollan #1185A, (urethane) which is resistant to all microbiological and ozone exposure. 

Q10. What does NPT stand for?

The standard thread found in the USA, is National Pipe Taper threads, abbreviated to NPT. NPT threaded fittings have a slight taper to them and when mated together and tightened, the threads compress to form a seal. Some confusion may result from the use of NPT, FPT, and MPT in describing threads. Both FPT and MPT are NPT threads, with FPT meaning female threads (internal) and MPT meaning male threads (external). This type of thread when mated, may contain slight gaps between the major and minor diameter of the threads. Because of this, a thread seal agent may be required.

Q11. For your threaded plumbing connections, do you typically use pipe dope (Pipe Joint Compound), thread tape (aka Teflon Tape) or some other type of sealant/lubricant?

We recommend 3M Marine Adhesive Sealant (Fast Cure 5200). This sealant is preferred because it has proven to not clog the diaphragm inside the valve like some pipe joint compounds do. Also, the Teflon tape has not held up as well as the 3M Marine Adhesive, so it is not recommended.

Q12. What is the main problem that you find when valves are not working properly?

With the construction of the valves and materials used, we find almost no problems. The very few instances where problems were reported involved residue clogging the diaphragm hole(s) due to the use of pipe-joint compound. We have found that with the use of the 3M Marine Adhesive these issues are no longer reported.

Q13. Which valves use diaphragms that have the center hole punched out and what size is it?

While all diaphragms have at least 1 small off-center hole any valves that use our Blue/White pilot have an additional hole in the center measuring 3/32″